Work Smart with Agile CRM WordPress Integration

Work Smart with Agile CRM WordPress Integration

Before I began working for Agile CRM, I was a customer. Let me share the moment I knew Agile CRM was the customer relationship management system for my business, and how Agile CRM WordPress integration ultimately sold me on the platform.

It was early 2015, and I had reviewed all the major CRM players for my small business. There was Salesforce.com, but it was too huge and costly for my budget. There were narrow and somewhat elegant CRMs such as Capsule CRM and Nimble, but I wasn’t sure I was getting enough value for my monthly subscription fee beyond what Google Contacts and my aging on-premise CRM offered. Then there was Agile CRM.

While Agile CRM had a dramatically larger feature set than any other SMB CRM at its price point, what ultimately caught my attention was its automation and web tracking functionality.

Unlike the competition, Agile CRM could track my contacts as they viewed my company’s web site—and automatically act on this data to serve a customized pop-up ad, tag the contact or raise their lead score, notify me in real-time that the person was viewing a specific page on my site, or even initiate a specific drip email campaign based on the characteristics of my contact and what pages they were viewing.

One of my friends at Microsoft summed it up perfectly: “Wow, that’s some pretty cool functionality.”

Agile CRM WordPress Integration: Web Tracking on Steroids

Many of us use WordPress for our web site. A lot of us, in fact; nearly a third of all web sites currently are powered by WordPress, according to the latest stats, WordPress completely dominates the content management system marketplace with a 59 percent market share. To put this in perspective, the next two most popular CMS systems, Joomla and Drupal, have a market share of 11.6 percent combined. The web runs on WordPress, especially for small business.

The ubiquity of WordPress is a good thing, because it means there is massive developer community maintaining plugins and simplifying web site creation and maintenance for us. Before there was an app for everything, there was a WordPress plugin for everything. This includes a plugin that makes Agile CRM’s cool web tracking functionality very easy to install and use.

Getting your web site to talk with your CRM normally requires a code snippet added to your site, maybe more. If you’re talking automation between your site and your CRM, things often get more complicated.

In a textbook case for why businesses should be using WordPress, however, Agile CRM WordPress integration makes this process crazy easy. You install the Agile CRM plugin from within your WordPress dashboard, enter your Agile CRM account information, and then the two systems are linked. Agile CRM handles the rest.

When you connect the two systems, you immediately can track your contacts as they view your web site. The pages they view, and how long they view them, are logged within Agile CRM so you and anyone helping you with marketing, sales or customer service can immediately know when and how much your contact has been on your site.

When combined with Agile CRM’s powerful automation system, this tracking becomes really powerful. You can set up web rules that act on visitor behavior so tracking translates into action instead of just more data that is nice but not ultimately used.

You build your own web rules, so the range of potential workflow automations is almost endless. But here’s one example that sold me on Agile CRM many years ago.

A prospect signs up for my e-mail list through a pop-up on my web site, which makes them a contact within Agile CRM. I then track the pages they view. When a prospect visits a product page twice, the CRM initiates a personalized email campaign to this contact around the product they have been viewing—and tags the contact as a hot prospect. If the prospect then clicks on the email campaign I have sent, I get a real-time notification on my laptop and call the prospect right away to close the sale.

This is web tracking on steroids, and why web tracking combined with automation might be the best reason to choose Agile CRM for contact management.

Wait, But There’s More…

While the mix of web tracking and automation is the showstopper for me, Agile CRM WordPress integration also makes several marketing administrative tasks easier.

In addition to enabling easy web tracking and automation based on that tracking, the plugin also makes several other Agile CRM marketing features available from within WordPress. This means SMBs can configure these web-related features from within WordPress instead of having them decentralized. This is good news for SMBs, especially those who are less tech-savvy and have built their whole web operation around the WordPress dashboard (and that would be many small businesses).

From within a tab in WordPress, businesses can access Agile CRM’s landing page builder, its form builder, its email campaign builder, and the web rules builder I’ve gushed so glowingly about.

These other features, especially the landing page and form builders, are key marketing tools that businesses should be using. They make it easy to set up landing pages for specific campaigns where prospects can enter their name and email address for more information, to access a particular part of the site, or for a free gift. This is online marketing 101, and now it can be done from within WordPress, tied to the CRM, and completed without additional plugins.

Businesses that don’t use WordPress still can take advantage of Agile CRM’s web tracking, automation, landing page builder and other we site-related features, of course. These businesses don’t know what they’re missing, though, because the WordPress plugin makes setup and administration of these features extra easy.

Web tracking and automation features were why I chose Agile CRM several years ago. The WordPress plugin makes using those features easier than I expected, too.

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Peter Kowalke

Peter Kowalke is a journalist and editor who has been covering business, technology and lifestyle trends for more than 20 years.

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